Attractions in Budapest

Budapest attractions listed by popularity

The origins of the expansive Buda Castle go back to the 13th century. The imposing castle is home to two museums and is a must-see for anyone visiting Budapest.

This magnificent suspension bridge connects Buda with Pest across the Danube river. The 375 meter long bridge was built in 1849 after a design by William Tierney Clark.

Heroes’ Square was created at the end of the 19th century to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest. The square is bordered by the Museum of Fine Arts and the Palace of Art, an exhibition hall.

The Fisherman’s Bastion, situated in the picturesque Castle District, is a romanticized version of a medieval bastion complete with beautiful turrets and ramparts.

The Parliament House is a magnificent 19th century building situated at Pest’s river bank. The neogothic building is clearly inspired by London’s Houses of Parliament.

Long the coronation church of Hungary, Matthias Church is one of the most important churches in Budapest. The original church was built in the 13th century. Its current appearance is the result of a 19th century restoration.

Városliget, Budapest’s City Park, offers all sorts of attractions including a historic amusement park, a zoo, a castle and one of Europe’s greatest spa complexes.

Budapest’s largest church was built between 1851 and 1906. Its majestic dome towers over the skyline of Pest. Inside is a shrine with Hungary’s most important relic, the hand of St. Stephen.

Gellért Hill is named after a Christian martyr. At the top of the hill is a large 19th century citadel built by the Habsburgs. Near the citadel stands a tall monument originally built in honor of the Soviet army.

The largest covered market in Budapest is housed in a beautiful end of the 19th century structure. The market is a popular attraction with both locals and visitors.

Budapest’s Margaret Island (Margitsziget) is a green recreational island in the middle of the Danube river close to the city center. It is a favorite destination for locals during their day off.

Trinity Square, the historical heart of Buda, is bordered by a number of historic buildings including the Matthias Church and the Old Town Hall of Buda. At its center stands a large plague column.

Párisi udvar (Parisian Court) is a magnificent shopping arcade with a marvelous glass dome. The early 20th century arcade is richly decorated with reliefs and sculptures.

The Millennium Monument honors Hungary’s heroes. It was created at the end of the 19th century for the thousand-year anniversary of the conquest of Hungary by Magyar tribes.

The Hungarian National Museum narrates the more than 1000 year long history of Hungary through the display of objects from the Árpád dynasty in the 10th century to the Communist era in the 20th century.

Budapest’s spacious Freedom Square is surrounded by several impressive early 20th century architectural landmarks. It is also the site of a monument to Soviet soldiers.

This monument on the namesake hill is built in 1904 in honor of the bishop Gellért, who converted Magyars to Christianity but was killed here by opponents of the new religion.

Kerepesi Cemetery is the last resting place for many of Hungary’s greatest figures. It is one of Europe’s most magnificent cemeteries, strewn with monumental mausoleums and tombs decorated with fine memorial sculptures.

The Liberty Monument is a tall monument originally erected in 1947 in honor of Soviet soldiers. Its prominent position at the summit of Gellért Hill makes it one of the most visible landmarks in Budapest.

This pedestrianized street in the heart of Budapest’s downtown area is the city’s most popular shopping street. The street is lined with some noteworthy buildings and embellished with several fountains.

This centrally located square is named after the 19th century poet Mihály Vörösmarty, whose statue features prominently at the center of the square.

Many of the monumental statues that were erected in Budapest during the Communist era are now on display at Memento Park. There are also some exhibits that shed light on the life in Hungary during the Cold War era.

The State Opera House was built between 1875 and 1884 as part of the commemoration of Hungary’s millennial anniversary. It is one of the city’s grandest buildings, decorated with plenty of statuary and frescoes.

This complex of buildings in different architectural styles was originally built as a mock castle for the 1896 millennium exhibition but later rebuilt as a permanent structure.

Duna-Korzó or Danube Promenade is a popular esplanade along the embankment of the Danube in Pest. Some of the most notable sights in the area include the Vigadó concert hall and the Little Princess statue.

The New York Palace was built in the late 19th century for an American insurance company. The building is famous for its New York Café on the ground floor, which claims to be the world’s most beautiful coffeehouse.

The Museum of Fine arts is one of the most important museums in Budapest. It exhibits a large collection of art, including paintings from the old masters as well as objects from Ancient Egypt and the Antiquity.

The Sikló is a popular transport mode for visitors who want to get to the Buda Castle at the top of the Buda Hill. The funicular was created in the 19th century, and was one of the first of its kind in Europe.

This palace in Sezession style – the Hungarian variant of Art Nouveau – was built in 1906 for the Gresham Life Insurance Company. Today the palace serves as a luxury hotel.

The Széchenyi Baths, a famous medicinal bath complex in Budapest’s city park, is the largest of its kind in Europe. The baths are housed in a magnificent neo-Baroque building.

The Hungarian National Gallery is a museum devoted to Hungarian art from the Middle Ages to the present day. The museum is housed in the royal palace of the Buda Castle.

Budapest’s new National Theatre opened in 2002 at a remote site near the Danube river. The building is a modern interpretation of the grand theatre houses of the nineteenth century.

The Gellért Hotel is the oldest luxury hotel in Budapest. It was built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style at the site of a thermal spring. The hotel is best known for its fabulously decorated baths.

In the early 20th century a natural cave in the south slope of Gellért Hill was converted into a chapel. The interior is atmospheric, with dim lighting and some peculiar decorations.

The Matthias fountain shows a hunting scene from the romanticized tale of Ilonka, a young peasant girl who fell in love with King Matthias. The fountain is one of the most monumental in Budapest.

The Roman city of Aquincum flourished during the 3rd century AD when thousands of people lived here. Today visitors can wander through the ruins of Aquincum. A museum highlights the most interesting excavated items.

The Freedom Bridge, a beautiful iron bridge, was built at the end of the 19th century as the third permanent bridge over the Danube. It was inaugurated by Emperor Franz Joseph during the millennial festivities.

Elisabeth Square (Erzsébet tér in Hungarian) is one of the largest green spaces in Central Pest. The star attraction is the monumental Danube Fountain. The square was expanded around the turn of the 21st century with a modern extension.

The history of the parish church of Belváros, the inner city of Pest, goes back almost 1000 years. Its present-day appearance is the result of an 18th century reconstruction.

The City Hall of Budapest was originally built in the 18th century as a house for war veterans. In 1894 the monumental Baroque building was converted into a city hall complex.

Margaret Bridge links Margaret Island with Pest and Buda. The bridge was only the second permanent bridge over the river Danube. Its pillars are decorated with massive sculptures.

East Station or Keleti pu was built in 1884 in eclectic style. Also known as Central Station, this is the largest and most important of Budapests’s three international railway stations.

The Elisabeth Bridge is a sleek modern bridge that was built in the early 1960s to replace an older iron suspension bridge. Near the bridge is a monument of Queen Elisabeth, after whom the bridge is named.

The Vigadó is a magnificent concert hall situated along the Danube promenade. The concert hall was built in the mid 19th century in the Romanticism style.

The botanical garden known as Füvészkert has some 7000 different plant species on display, including palm trees, cacti, exotic carnivorous plants and giant Amazon water lilies.

West (Nyugati) Station was built at the end of the 19th century. With its progressive glass and iron design by the French architectural firm of Gustave Eiffel, the station is a favorite with architecture buffs.

Budapest’s largest synagogue – one of the world’s largest – was built between 1854 and 1859 by the Viennese architect Ludwig Förster in a Byzantine-Moorish style.

Gerbeaud is Budapest’s most famous confectionery. It is housed in a grand building that overlooks Vörösmarty Square in the heart of the city. Its interior is beautifully decorated in a mix of Art Nouveau and Rococo styles.

Batthyány Square is at the heart of Víziváros, a neighborhood in Buda squeezed between Castle Hill and the Danube. It is bordered by a number of interesting buildings, such as an 18th century inn and a Baroque church.

The bottomless lake was created at the end of the 19th century when a large clay pit was filled in with water. The lake is set in a park with several monuments, including one honoring Hungarian composer Bartók.

Budapest attractions listed alphabetically

The Roman city of Aquincum flourished during the 3rd century AD when thousands of people lived here. Today visitors can wander through the ruins of Aquincum. A museum highlights the most interesting excavated items.

Batthyány Square is at the heart of Víziváros, a neighborhood in Buda squeezed between Castle Hill and the Danube. It is bordered by a number of interesting buildings, such as an 18th century inn and a Baroque church.

The botanical garden known as Füvészkert has some 7000 different plant species on display, including palm trees, cacti, exotic carnivorous plants and giant Amazon water lilies.

The bottomless lake was created at the end of the 19th century when a large clay pit was filled in with water. The lake is set in a park with several monuments, including one honoring Hungarian composer Bartók.

The origins of the expansive Buda Castle go back to the 13th century. The imposing castle is home to two museums and is a must-see for anyone visiting Budapest.

The Sikló is a popular transport mode for visitors who want to get to the Buda Castle at the top of the Buda Hill. The funicular was created in the 19th century, and was one of the first of its kind in Europe.

In the early 20th century a natural cave in the south slope of Gellért Hill was converted into a chapel. The interior is atmospheric, with dim lighting and some peculiar decorations.

The largest covered market in Budapest is housed in a beautiful end of the 19th century structure. The market is a popular attraction with both locals and visitors.

This magnificent suspension bridge connects Buda with Pest across the Danube river. The 375 meter long bridge was built in 1849 after a design by William Tierney Clark.

The City Hall of Budapest was originally built in the 18th century as a house for war veterans. In 1894 the monumental Baroque building was converted into a city hall complex.

Városliget, Budapest’s City Park, offers all sorts of attractions including a historic amusement park, a zoo, a castle and one of Europe’s greatest spa complexes.

Duna-Korzó or Danube Promenade is a popular esplanade along the embankment of the Danube in Pest. Some of the most notable sights in the area include the Vigadó concert hall and the Little Princess statue.

East Station or Keleti pu was built in 1884 in eclectic style. Also known as Central Station, this is the largest and most important of Budapests’s three international railway stations.

The Elisabeth Bridge is a sleek modern bridge that was built in the early 1960s to replace an older iron suspension bridge. Near the bridge is a monument of Queen Elisabeth, after whom the bridge is named.

Elisabeth Square (Erzsébet tér in Hungarian) is one of the largest green spaces in Central Pest. The star attraction is the monumental Danube Fountain. The square was expanded around the turn of the 21st century with a modern extension.

The Fisherman’s Bastion, situated in the picturesque Castle District, is a romanticized version of a medieval bastion complete with beautiful turrets and ramparts.

The Freedom Bridge, a beautiful iron bridge, was built at the end of the 19th century as the third permanent bridge over the Danube. It was inaugurated by Emperor Franz Joseph during the millennial festivities.

Budapest’s spacious Freedom Square is surrounded by several impressive early 20th century architectural landmarks. It is also the site of a monument to Soviet soldiers.

Gellért Hill is named after a Christian martyr. At the top of the hill is a large 19th century citadel built by the Habsburgs. Near the citadel stands a tall monument originally built in honor of the Soviet army.

The Gellért Hotel is the oldest luxury hotel in Budapest. It was built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style at the site of a thermal spring. The hotel is best known for its fabulously decorated baths.

This monument on the namesake hill is built in 1904 in honor of the bishop Gellért, who converted Magyars to Christianity but was killed here by opponents of the new religion.

Gerbeaud is Budapest’s most famous confectionery. It is housed in a grand building that overlooks Vörösmarty Square in the heart of the city. Its interior is beautifully decorated in a mix of Art Nouveau and Rococo styles.

Budapest’s largest synagogue – one of the world’s largest – was built between 1854 and 1859 by the Viennese architect Ludwig Förster in a Byzantine-Moorish style.

This palace in Sezession style – the Hungarian variant of Art Nouveau – was built in 1906 for the Gresham Life Insurance Company. Today the palace serves as a luxury hotel.

Heroes’ Square was created at the end of the 19th century to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest. The square is bordered by the Museum of Fine Arts and the Palace of Art, an exhibition hall.

The Hungarian National Gallery is a museum devoted to Hungarian art from the Middle Ages to the present day. The museum is housed in the royal palace of the Buda Castle.

The Hungarian National Museum narrates the more than 1000 year long history of Hungary through the display of objects from the Árpád dynasty in the 10th century to the Communist era in the 20th century.

The history of the parish church of Belváros, the inner city of Pest, goes back almost 1000 years. Its present-day appearance is the result of an 18th century reconstruction.

Kerepesi Cemetery is the last resting place for many of Hungary’s greatest figures. It is one of Europe’s most magnificent cemeteries, strewn with monumental mausoleums and tombs decorated with fine memorial sculptures.

The Liberty Monument is a tall monument originally erected in 1947 in honor of Soviet soldiers. Its prominent position at the summit of Gellért Hill makes it one of the most visible landmarks in Budapest.

Margaret Bridge links Margaret Island with Pest and Buda. The bridge was only the second permanent bridge over the river Danube. Its pillars are decorated with massive sculptures.

Budapest’s Margaret Island (Margitsziget) is a green recreational island in the middle of the Danube river close to the city center. It is a favorite destination for locals during their day off.

Long the coronation church of Hungary, Matthias Church is one of the most important churches in Budapest. The original church was built in the 13th century. Its current appearance is the result of a 19th century restoration.

The Matthias fountain shows a hunting scene from the romanticized tale of Ilonka, a young peasant girl who fell in love with King Matthias. The fountain is one of the most monumental in Budapest.

Many of the monumental statues that were erected in Budapest during the Communist era are now on display at Memento Park. There are also some exhibits that shed light on the life in Hungary during the Cold War era.

The Millennium Monument honors Hungary’s heroes. It was created at the end of the 19th century for the thousand-year anniversary of the conquest of Hungary by Magyar tribes.

The Museum of Fine arts is one of the most important museums in Budapest. It exhibits a large collection of art, including paintings from the old masters as well as objects from Ancient Egypt and the Antiquity.

Budapest’s new National Theatre opened in 2002 at a remote site near the Danube river. The building is a modern interpretation of the grand theatre houses of the nineteenth century.

The New York Palace was built in the late 19th century for an American insurance company. The building is famous for its New York Café on the ground floor, which claims to be the world’s most beautiful coffeehouse.

Párisi udvar (Parisian Court) is a magnificent shopping arcade with a marvelous glass dome. The early 20th century arcade is richly decorated with reliefs and sculptures.

The Parliament House is a magnificent 19th century building situated at Pest’s river bank. The neogothic building is clearly inspired by London’s Houses of Parliament.

Budapest’s largest church was built between 1851 and 1906. Its majestic dome towers over the skyline of Pest. Inside is a shrine with Hungary’s most important relic, the hand of St. Stephen.

The State Opera House was built between 1875 and 1884 as part of the commemoration of Hungary’s millennial anniversary. It is one of the city’s grandest buildings, decorated with plenty of statuary and frescoes.

The Széchenyi Baths, a famous medicinal bath complex in Budapest’s city park, is the largest of its kind in Europe. The baths are housed in a magnificent neo-Baroque building.

Trinity Square, the historical heart of Buda, is bordered by a number of historic buildings including the Matthias Church and the Old Town Hall of Buda. At its center stands a large plague column.

This pedestrianized street in the heart of Budapest’s downtown area is the city’s most popular shopping street. The street is lined with some noteworthy buildings and embellished with several fountains.

This complex of buildings in different architectural styles was originally built as a mock castle for the 1896 millennium exhibition but later rebuilt as a permanent structure.

The Vigadó is a magnificent concert hall situated along the Danube promenade. The concert hall was built in the mid 19th century in the Romanticism style.

This centrally located square is named after the 19th century poet Mihály Vörösmarty, whose statue features prominently at the center of the square.

West (Nyugati) Station was built at the end of the 19th century. With its progressive glass and iron design by the French architectural firm of Gustave Eiffel, the station is a favorite with architecture buffs.

Scroll to Top