Attractions in Washington, DC

Washington, DC attractions listed by popularity

The Washington Monument was built as a tribute to the first President of the United States. The 555ft structure was the tallest building in the world when completed in 1884.

The US Capitol houses the legislative branch of the American government: both the Senate and the House of Representatives gather in this symbol of American government.

The White House is the official residence of the President of the United States. Soon after its completion in 1800 the building was nicknamed ‘white house’, and it became the official name about a century later.

The National Air and Space Museum is one of the world’s most popular museums, with a collection including thousands of aviation and space related artifacts such as the Apollo 11 command module.

The Iwo Jima Memorial was modeled after a Pulitzer-prize winning photograph taken on the island of Iwo Jima during WWII. The Memorial is dedicated to all marines who have given their lives in battle.

The Lincoln Memorial was built in 1922 as a tribute to the slain president Abraham Lincoln. The memorial is often used as a gathering place for protests and political rallies.

Dedicated on July 27, 1995 this memorial depicts 19 American soldiers making their way through the rough terrain of Korea. It honors those who took part in the Korean War in the early 1950s.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a long wall in black granite honoring those who served in the Vietnam War. Inscribed are all the names of those who died in the Vietnam war.

This memorial on the bank of the Tidal Basin pays tribute to Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States and considered one of the greatest figures in the history of the nation.

The three steel spires forming the Air Force Memorial evoke the ‘bomb burst’, a demonstration flight maneuver performed by the US Air Force Thunderbird Demonstration Team.

This large memorial honors those who served in the American Armed Forces during the Second World War. Dedicated in 2004, the memorial includes 56 pillars encircling a central pool.

Dedicated on July 27, 1995 this memorial depicts 19 American soldiers making their way through the rough terrain of Korea. It honors those who took part in the Korean War in the early 1950s.

The Gothic design of this 20th century cathedral was inspired by the medieval European cathedrals. Construction started in 1907 but it took 83 years before the cathedral was finally completed in 1990.

The National Mall is a strip of green between the US Capitol and the Washington Monument. Most of Washington’s museums and Federal institutions are situated around the mall.

The Tidal Basin – a large man-made inlet – is best known for the cherry trees lining its shores but it is also the site of several large memorials: the Jefferson Memorial, FDR Memorial and MLK Memorial can all be found here.

What started in 1937 as a collection of 141 European paintings is now one the largest collections of western art in the nation. The museum is housed in two buildings with contrasting architecture.

This large memorial, which opened in 1997, honors Franklin D. Roosevelt, president of the United States of America from 1933 until 1945. The memorial covers a total of about 7.5 acres, or 3ha.

With its 13 horses, this monument is one of the world’s largest equestrian statues. Completed in 1922, the memorial honors Ulysses S. Grant, Union general in the American Civil War.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress has one of the largest collections in the world. In 1897 the library moved to the current magnificent edifice known as the Jefferson Building.

The Supreme Court, the highest judicial court in the United States of America, is seated in this imposing neo-classical structure, built in 1932 – 1935 after a design by Cass Gilbert.

The Arlington Cemetery was established in 1864 when the Federal Government confiscated the estate of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Today, more than 300.000 people are buried here.

In the National Museum of American History you find numerous items that are related to the history of the United States. Among them many historic objects, but also items that reflect popular culture, such as a jersey worn by Michael Jordan.

This memorial at the Navy Memorial Plaza features the statue of a sailor on a large ‘granite sea’. It was built between 1985 and 1987 as a tribute to all those who server in the US Navy.

The Smithsonian Castle, a grand structure built in 1855, was the original home of the museums of the Smithsonian Institution. Today it houses most of the museum’s administrative offices.

This historic theatre building opened in 1833. It was the site of President Lincoln’s assassination in 1865 by John Wilkes Booth. Today it is an active theater with an onsite museum.

This historic early 19th century square near the White House features several statues of revolutionary war heroes as well as a statue of Andrew Jackson, the 7th US President.

Bartholdi Park is a small triangular park near the US Capitol. It features miniature themed gardens and the 19th century Bartholdi Fountain, created by French sculptor Bartholdi.

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria was built in the early twentieth century by Freemasons. It honors one of the most famous Freemasons in US history, George Washington.

One of the top museums in Washington DC, the National Museum of Natural History boasts an especially large collection of mammals. It is housed in a classical building completed in 1910.

The National Zoo was founded at the end of the 19th century. The most popular attraction of the zoo are its Giant Pandas, but you’ll encounter plenty of other popular animals.

The nation’s first museum honoring American Indians opened in 2004 in a magnificent limestone building. The building’s unique exterior resembles natural stone formations.

The Pentagon, the immense military headquarters of the US Department of Defense, was built in 1942 after just 16 months of construction. It was almost twice the size of the largest office building at the time.

Annexed by Washington in 1871, Georgetown is one of the capital’s most attractive neighborhoods thanks to its historic character. The streets are lined with beautiful brick houses in Federal Style.

At 375ft or 96m, this building is one of Washington’s tallest structures. Slated for demolition in the 1970s, it was saved and converted into a multifunctional complex.

A modern memorial honors Martin Luther King, Jr, a civil-rights leader and Nobel Prize winner who was assassinated in 1968. The centerpiece of the memorial is a tall granite statue of King, created by the Chinese sculptor Lei Yixin.

The Christopher Columbus Memorial Fountain, one of the most monumental fountains in Washington, DC, was erected in 1912 on Union Station Plaza. It honors the famous explorer Columbus, who set foot on American shores in 1492.

With its 13 horses, this monument is one of the world’s largest equestrian statues. Completed in 1922, the memorial honors Ulysses S. Grant, Union general in the American Civil War.

The Phillips Collection is an art gallery with thousands of works of modern art. It boasts a particularly fine selection of impressionist art. The collection is housed in the parental home of its founder, Duncan Phillips.

The large collection of paintings, photos and images of Americans is housed in the former US Patent Office Building, a historic building the museum shares with the American Art Museum.

The country’s oldest collection dedicated to American Art – now part of the Smithsonian Institution – is housed in the historic 19th century US Patent office building.

Dupont Circle is both a large traffic circle and neighborhood in the north-west of Washington, DC. The centerpiece of Dupont Circle is a monumental fountain dedicated to a Civil War naval hero.

One of Washington’s greatest Greek Revival buildings was constructed in the 19th century and saved from demolition in the 1950s. It is now home to two museums.

Bronze lion statues grace the entrance to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, a memorial that honors officers who were killed on the job. The memorial occupies a complete plaza and is surrounded by grand buildings.

Meridian Hill Park is one of the most beautiful parks in the capital of the U.S. The park features an enormous cascade and several statues, including one of president James Buchanan.

Appropriately located in a historical 19th century building, this museum has exhibits on architecture, construction and engineering, interior design, urban planning and landscape architecture.

The Corcoran is one of the oldest art galleries in the US. It is best known for its collection of historic American paintings, which illustrates the evolution of American art from colonial times to the twentieth century.

The historic Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, constructed between 1828 and 1850 runs through Georgetown, Washington for about 1.5 miles, lined with beautiful houses in Georgian and Federal Style.

The Hirshhorn Museum opened in 1974 on the National Mall with a collection of modern art donated by Joseph Hirshhorn. Outside is a sunken sculpture garden with plenty of works from famous modern sculptors.

Washington, DC attractions listed alphabetically

The three steel spires forming the Air Force Memorial evoke the ‘bomb burst’, a demonstration flight maneuver performed by the US Air Force Thunderbird Demonstration Team.

The country’s oldest collection dedicated to American Art – now part of the Smithsonian Institution – is housed in the historic 19th century US Patent office building.

The Arlington Cemetery was established in 1864 when the Federal Government confiscated the estate of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Today, more than 300.000 people are buried here.

Bartholdi Park is a small triangular park near the US Capitol. It features miniature themed gardens and the 19th century Bartholdi Fountain, created by French sculptor Bartholdi.

The historic Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, constructed between 1828 and 1850 runs through Georgetown, Washington for about 1.5 miles, lined with beautiful houses in Georgian and Federal Style.

The Christopher Columbus Memorial Fountain, one of the most monumental fountains in Washington, DC, was erected in 1912 on Union Station Plaza. It honors the famous explorer Columbus, who set foot on American shores in 1492.

The Corcoran is one of the oldest art galleries in the US. It is best known for its collection of historic American paintings, which illustrates the evolution of American art from colonial times to the twentieth century.

Dupont Circle is both a large traffic circle and neighborhood in the north-west of Washington, DC. The centerpiece of Dupont Circle is a monumental fountain dedicated to a Civil War naval hero.

This historic theatre building opened in 1833. It was the site of President Lincoln’s assassination in 1865 by John Wilkes Booth. Today it is an active theater with an onsite museum.

This large memorial, which opened in 1997, honors Franklin D. Roosevelt, president of the United States of America from 1933 until 1945. The memorial covers a total of about 7.5 acres, or 3ha.

Annexed by Washington in 1871, Georgetown is one of the capital’s most attractive neighborhoods thanks to its historic character. The streets are lined with beautiful brick houses in Federal Style.

The Hirshhorn Museum opened in 1974 on the National Mall with a collection of modern art donated by Joseph Hirshhorn. Outside is a sunken sculpture garden with plenty of works from famous modern sculptors.

The Iwo Jima Memorial was modeled after a Pulitzer-prize winning photograph taken on the island of Iwo Jima during WWII. The Memorial is dedicated to all marines who have given their lives in battle.

This memorial on the bank of the Tidal Basin pays tribute to Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States and considered one of the greatest figures in the history of the nation.

Dedicated on July 27, 1995 this memorial depicts 19 American soldiers making their way through the rough terrain of Korea. It honors those who took part in the Korean War in the early 1950s.

Dedicated on July 27, 1995 this memorial depicts 19 American soldiers making their way through the rough terrain of Korea. It honors those who took part in the Korean War in the early 1950s.

This historic early 19th century square near the White House features several statues of revolutionary war heroes as well as a statue of Andrew Jackson, the 7th US President.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress has one of the largest collections in the world. In 1897 the library moved to the current magnificent edifice known as the Jefferson Building.

The Lincoln Memorial was built in 1922 as a tribute to the slain president Abraham Lincoln. The memorial is often used as a gathering place for protests and political rallies.

A modern memorial honors Martin Luther King, Jr, a civil-rights leader and Nobel Prize winner who was assassinated in 1968. The centerpiece of the memorial is a tall granite statue of King, created by the Chinese sculptor Lei Yixin.

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria was built in the early twentieth century by Freemasons. It honors one of the most famous Freemasons in US history, George Washington.

Meridian Hill Park is one of the most beautiful parks in the capital of the U.S. The park features an enormous cascade and several statues, including one of president James Buchanan.

The National Air and Space Museum is one of the world’s most popular museums, with a collection including thousands of aviation and space related artifacts such as the Apollo 11 command module.

Appropriately located in a historical 19th century building, this museum has exhibits on architecture, construction and engineering, interior design, urban planning and landscape architecture.

The Gothic design of this 20th century cathedral was inspired by the medieval European cathedrals. Construction started in 1907 but it took 83 years before the cathedral was finally completed in 1990.

What started in 1937 as a collection of 141 European paintings is now one the largest collections of western art in the nation. The museum is housed in two buildings with contrasting architecture.

Bronze lion statues grace the entrance to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, a memorial that honors officers who were killed on the job. The memorial occupies a complete plaza and is surrounded by grand buildings.

The National Mall is a strip of green between the US Capitol and the Washington Monument. Most of Washington’s museums and Federal institutions are situated around the mall.

In the National Museum of American History you find numerous items that are related to the history of the United States. Among them many historic objects, but also items that reflect popular culture, such as a jersey worn by Michael Jordan.

One of the top museums in Washington DC, the National Museum of Natural History boasts an especially large collection of mammals. It is housed in a classical building completed in 1910.

The nation’s first museum honoring American Indians opened in 2004 in a magnificent limestone building. The building’s unique exterior resembles natural stone formations.

The large collection of paintings, photos and images of Americans is housed in the former US Patent Office Building, a historic building the museum shares with the American Art Museum.

The National Zoo was founded at the end of the 19th century. The most popular attraction of the zoo are its Giant Pandas, but you’ll encounter plenty of other popular animals.

One of Washington’s greatest Greek Revival buildings was constructed in the 19th century and saved from demolition in the 1950s. It is now home to two museums.

At 375ft or 96m, this building is one of Washington’s tallest structures. Slated for demolition in the 1970s, it was saved and converted into a multifunctional complex.

The Pentagon, the immense military headquarters of the US Department of Defense, was built in 1942 after just 16 months of construction. It was almost twice the size of the largest office building at the time.

The Phillips Collection is an art gallery with thousands of works of modern art. It boasts a particularly fine selection of impressionist art. The collection is housed in the parental home of its founder, Duncan Phillips.

The Smithsonian Castle, a grand structure built in 1855, was the original home of the museums of the Smithsonian Institution. Today it houses most of the museum’s administrative offices.

The Tidal Basin – a large man-made inlet – is best known for the cherry trees lining its shores but it is also the site of several large memorials: the Jefferson Memorial, FDR Memorial and MLK Memorial can all be found here.

With its 13 horses, this monument is one of the world’s largest equestrian statues. Completed in 1922, the memorial honors Ulysses S. Grant, Union general in the American Civil War.

With its 13 horses, this monument is one of the world’s largest equestrian statues. Completed in 1922, the memorial honors Ulysses S. Grant, Union general in the American Civil War.

The US Capitol houses the legislative branch of the American government: both the Senate and the House of Representatives gather in this symbol of American government.

This memorial at the Navy Memorial Plaza features the statue of a sailor on a large ‘granite sea’. It was built between 1985 and 1987 as a tribute to all those who server in the US Navy.

The Supreme Court, the highest judicial court in the United States of America, is seated in this imposing neo-classical structure, built in 1932 – 1935 after a design by Cass Gilbert.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a long wall in black granite honoring those who served in the Vietnam War. Inscribed are all the names of those who died in the Vietnam war.

The Washington Monument was built as a tribute to the first President of the United States. The 555ft structure was the tallest building in the world when completed in 1884.

The White House is the official residence of the President of the United States. Soon after its completion in 1800 the building was nicknamed ‘white house’, and it became the official name about a century later.

This large memorial honors those who served in the American Armed Forces during the Second World War. Dedicated in 2004, the memorial includes 56 pillars encircling a central pool.

Scroll to Top