Attractions in Boston

Boston attractions listed by popularity

The nation’s oldest public city park and the adjacent public garden form central Boston’s green lung. The park is also the starting point for the Freedom Trail.

The Freedom Trail is a 4km/2.5mi long trail leading connecting 16 of Boston’s most historic places. The trail starts at Boston Common and a ends at the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown.

Quincy Market, built in 1826 as an expansion to the Faneuil Hall, is now one of Boston’s most popular attractions thanks to more than 100 shops and restaurants.

This popular formal garden at the heart of Boston’s historic center is best known for the Swan boats. They have been a popular tourist attraction since the first boats were operated in 1877.

This 18th century building is one of the grandest of its time. The architect was later awarded the supervision of the construction of the Capitol building in Washington, DC.

The glass John Hancock Tower was built in 1976 and is the tallest building in Boston. The modern structure designed by I.M. Pei contrasts with the neighborhood’s 19th century buildings.

This is one of Boston’s most historic buildings. On July 18, 1776, the citizens of Boston first heard the words of the Declaration of Independence here, read from atop the balcony of the Old State House.

Beacon Hill, a small district in central Boston is one of the city’s oldest. The 19th century area district with brick houses in Federal, Victorian and Georgian styles even has some streets paved with cobblestones.

Prudential Center is a complex originally built in Boston’s Back Bay district during the 1960s as one of the city’s first urban renewal projects. The centerpiece of the complex is the 750ft / 229m tall Prudential Tower.

Downtown Boston’s oldest building was home to one of the city’s most famous patriots, Paul Revere. The wooden house was originally built in 1680 by Robert Howard.

The neo-classical building of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts houses one of the largest art collections in the United States; its Asian and Egyptian collections are particularly impressive.

Faneuil Hall, a historic building in Georgian style is the center of Boston’s Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a popular area with food stalls, restaurants, shops and street entertainment.

The main attraction of Boston’s aquarium is the ‘Ocean Tank’, a large circular tank with sharks, sea turtles, barracudas, moray eels and many more exotic species.

Known as ‘Old Ironsides’, this historic warship was built at the end of the 18th century. Now a national landmark, it is one of the most popular attractions on Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Fenway Park is one of the last remaining classic ballparks in baseball. Even though seating capacity has been increased and amenities have improved, the stadium still retains much of its original charm.

The Custom House was built in 1847 as a Greek temple near the waterfront. The building became Boston’s first skyscraper in 1913, when a tower was added on top of the neoclassical temple.

This obelisk was erected in 1842 on Breed’s Hill in Charleston. It commemorates the Battle of Bunker Hill of 1775, where the colonial army lost a battle against the British.

Back Bay, developed in the 19th century, is a district in French style. Most of its brownstone houses, built for the richer Bostonians, have survived the demolition frenzy of the 1960s & 1970s.

Located in the picturesque Beacon Hill district and surrounded by 19th century brick rowhouses, Boston’s only private square marks one of the city’s most prestigious addresses.

MIT

The campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – one of the world’s most prestigious universities in engineering and science – is dotted with architectural masterpieces and modern sculptures.

As its name implies, Long Wharf was the longest wharf in the Boston Harbor, stretching from the commercial center deep into the harbor. It could easily accommodate even the largest clippers.

This Romanesque church, located in the fashionable Back Bay district was built in the late 19th century for the Trinity parish. The granite and stone building is 64 meters high and weighs a massive 40,000 ton.

Harvard Yard is a 25 acre large green area at the center of the illustrious Harvard University in Cambridge. It is surrounded by historic 18th century buildings.

The chaotic looking building opened in 2004 at MIT’s campus in Cambridge, causing much controversy due to its unconventional design. The structure still polarizes architecture critics.

Rowes Wharf is a modern development on Boston’s waterfront. Completed in 1987, the complex is typified by its large archway known as the Gateway to Boston.

Copley Square, located in the fashionable Back Bay district is surrounded by architectural landmarks such as Trinity Church, the Boston Public Library and the John Hancock Tower.

Old South Meeting House was built in 1729 as a Puritan place of worship. It soon became a place were revolutionaries gathered, most famously on the eve of the Boston Tea Party.

This icon of brutalist architecture is one of the city’s most controversial buildings, as the concrete building contrasts heavily with Boston’s historic architecture.

South End is a neighborhood with a somewhat bohemian atmosphere situated just south of the posh Back Bay area. It is however the largest Victorian brickhouse district in the United States.

At the turn of the 20th century, the swampy area bordering the newly created Back Bay neighborhood was turned into a parkland by the renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead.

This church is part of a complex of buildings that comprise the headquarters of the Church of Christ, Scientist. Its main attraction is the Mapparium: a large stained glass globe.

South Station is a monumental railway station built at the end of the 19th century. After it was saved from demolition in the 1970s the building was thoroughly renovated in the 1980s.

Boston attractions listed alphabetically

Back Bay, developed in the 19th century, is a district in French style. Most of its brownstone houses, built for the richer Bostonians, have survived the demolition frenzy of the 1960s & 1970s.

At the turn of the 20th century, the swampy area bordering the newly created Back Bay neighborhood was turned into a parkland by the renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead.

Beacon Hill, a small district in central Boston is one of the city’s oldest. The 19th century area district with brick houses in Federal, Victorian and Georgian styles even has some streets paved with cobblestones.

The nation’s oldest public city park and the adjacent public garden form central Boston’s green lung. The park is also the starting point for the Freedom Trail.

This obelisk was erected in 1842 on Breed’s Hill in Charleston. It commemorates the Battle of Bunker Hill of 1775, where the colonial army lost a battle against the British.

This church is part of a complex of buildings that comprise the headquarters of the Church of Christ, Scientist. Its main attraction is the Mapparium: a large stained glass globe.

This icon of brutalist architecture is one of the city’s most controversial buildings, as the concrete building contrasts heavily with Boston’s historic architecture.

Copley Square, located in the fashionable Back Bay district is surrounded by architectural landmarks such as Trinity Church, the Boston Public Library and the John Hancock Tower.

The Custom House was built in 1847 as a Greek temple near the waterfront. The building became Boston’s first skyscraper in 1913, when a tower was added on top of the neoclassical temple.

Faneuil Hall, a historic building in Georgian style is the center of Boston’s Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a popular area with food stalls, restaurants, shops and street entertainment.

Fenway Park is one of the last remaining classic ballparks in baseball. Even though seating capacity has been increased and amenities have improved, the stadium still retains much of its original charm.

The Freedom Trail is a 4km/2.5mi long trail leading connecting 16 of Boston’s most historic places. The trail starts at Boston Common and a ends at the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown.

Harvard Yard is a 25 acre large green area at the center of the illustrious Harvard University in Cambridge. It is surrounded by historic 18th century buildings.

The glass John Hancock Tower was built in 1976 and is the tallest building in Boston. The modern structure designed by I.M. Pei contrasts with the neighborhood’s 19th century buildings.

As its name implies, Long Wharf was the longest wharf in the Boston Harbor, stretching from the commercial center deep into the harbor. It could easily accommodate even the largest clippers.

Located in the picturesque Beacon Hill district and surrounded by 19th century brick rowhouses, Boston’s only private square marks one of the city’s most prestigious addresses.

MIT

The campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – one of the world’s most prestigious universities in engineering and science – is dotted with architectural masterpieces and modern sculptures.

The neo-classical building of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts houses one of the largest art collections in the United States; its Asian and Egyptian collections are particularly impressive.

The main attraction of Boston’s aquarium is the ‘Ocean Tank’, a large circular tank with sharks, sea turtles, barracudas, moray eels and many more exotic species.

Old South Meeting House was built in 1729 as a Puritan place of worship. It soon became a place were revolutionaries gathered, most famously on the eve of the Boston Tea Party.

This is one of Boston’s most historic buildings. On July 18, 1776, the citizens of Boston first heard the words of the Declaration of Independence here, read from atop the balcony of the Old State House.

Downtown Boston’s oldest building was home to one of the city’s most famous patriots, Paul Revere. The wooden house was originally built in 1680 by Robert Howard.

Prudential Center is a complex originally built in Boston’s Back Bay district during the 1960s as one of the city’s first urban renewal projects. The centerpiece of the complex is the 750ft / 229m tall Prudential Tower.

This popular formal garden at the heart of Boston’s historic center is best known for the Swan boats. They have been a popular tourist attraction since the first boats were operated in 1877.

Quincy Market, built in 1826 as an expansion to the Faneuil Hall, is now one of Boston’s most popular attractions thanks to more than 100 shops and restaurants.

Rowes Wharf is a modern development on Boston’s waterfront. Completed in 1987, the complex is typified by its large archway known as the Gateway to Boston.

South End is a neighborhood with a somewhat bohemian atmosphere situated just south of the posh Back Bay area. It is however the largest Victorian brickhouse district in the United States.

South Station is a monumental railway station built at the end of the 19th century. After it was saved from demolition in the 1970s the building was thoroughly renovated in the 1980s.

The chaotic looking building opened in 2004 at MIT’s campus in Cambridge, causing much controversy due to its unconventional design. The structure still polarizes architecture critics.

This 18th century building is one of the grandest of its time. The architect was later awarded the supervision of the construction of the Capitol building in Washington, DC.

This Romanesque church, located in the fashionable Back Bay district was built in the late 19th century for the Trinity parish. The granite and stone building is 64 meters high and weighs a massive 40,000 ton.

Known as ‘Old Ironsides’, this historic warship was built at the end of the 18th century. Now a national landmark, it is one of the most popular attractions on Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Scroll to Top