Attractions in Vienna

Vienna attractions listed by popularity

The Hofburg is an immense Imperial palace, built by generations of Habsburg rulers from the 13th century up to the early 20th century. It is home to a number of interesting museums such as the Schatzkammer.

The Belvedere is a magnificent baroque palace complex built in the early 18th century for Prince Eugène de Savoy. A trip to one of the museums allows visitors a chance to marvel at the magnificently decorated rooms.

Vienna’s Cathedral, the Gothic Stephansdom, was built in the 14th century at the site of an earlier church, of which two towers were incorporated. The majestic south tower still rises high over the city center.

As soon as the Schönbrunn Palace was completed, it became the favorite residence of the Habsburg family. Its Schlosspark is a magnificent park with numerous monuments and fountains.

Michaelerplatz is a square dominated by the Michaelertor, a grand archway leading to the heart of the Hofburg. Opposite are the modern Looshaus and the Michaelerkirche, one of Vienna’s oldest churches.

The Peterskirche is a high baroque church with an overwhelming interior excessively decorated with gilded sculpture groups and magnificent ceiling frescoes.

Between all the stately and formal buildings in Vienna, there are also some whimsical structures, most notably Hundertwasserhaus, a public housing unit converted by Hundertwasser into a colorful patchwork.

Austria’s Parliament is seated in a monumental neoclassical building completed in 1884 for the former Reichsrat. In front of the central portico stands a colossal statue of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

This square is built on ruins of a Roman garrison, as evidenced by an underground museum. Other attractions are a baroque 18th century fountain and the Ankeruhr, a magnificent Jugendstil clock.

The vast complex of the former imperial stables is now the site of a cluster of museums and cultural institutions as well as a number of cafés and shops, all arranged around an inviting inner courtyard.

Vienna’s opera house was constructed in 1869 as the Hofoper (court opera). The monumental building has a high renaissance design fronted by a beautiful Italianesque loggia.

The Schatzkammer – the imperial treasury chamber of the Habsburg dynasty – has a magnificent display of imperial symbols of power and wealth such as gem-studded crowns, orbs, scepters, and coronation mantles.

The Burgtheater is a grandiose structure built at the end of the 19th century to house the royal theater company , the second oldest still active theater company in Europe.

Karlsplatz is one of the largest squares in Vienna. Much of it is occupied by the Resselpark, where two beautiful former metro pavilions are located. Overlooking the park is Karlskirche, a glorious Baroque church.

Freyung is a triangular square bordered by the Schottenkirche, a church originally built in the 12th century by Irish monks. At the center of the square is the Austria Fountain, installed here in 1846.

The Freyung Passage is a beautiful historic arcade linking the Freyung square with Herrengasse. It was built in 1860 as part of the Ferstel Palace and is home to a number of luxury stores.

Vienna’s Neues Rathaus (new city hall) was built at the end of the 19th century in a Gothic Revival style. At the top of its 100 meter tall tower stands a statue known as the Rathausmann.

Heldenplatz is a spacious square near the former imperial palace of the Habsburg rulers. The square is named after two of Austria’s most famous war heroes, who are honored with large equestrian statues.

The Burggarten was created in the 19th century as a private garden for the imperial family. Highlights of the now public park include a statue of Mozart and a beautiful Palm House.

Graben is a pedestrianized shopping street in the center of Vienna. In the middle of the street stands a Baroque monument erected here to commemorate the end of the Plague epidemic of 1679.

The Ringstraße is a boulevard created in the 19th century at the site of the former city fortifications. In a span of just two decades a host of magnificent buildings were erected here, from a city hall to an opera house.

Maria-Theresien-Platz is a square that was laid out in the 19th century as part of an ambitious project to create a new museum complex. At the center stands a large monument dedicated to empress Maria Theresa.

Schwarzenbergplatz is a vast square intersected by wide roads. There are several sights at the square including a fountain, a Soviet monument and a statue of the prince after whom the square was named.

Am Hof is a large square in the center of Vienna. The square, originally the site of a castle, is now dominated by the white façade of the Kirche am Hof. In front of the 14th century church stands the black Marian Column.

The Stadtpark is a public park in Vienna, created in the mid 19th century along the Ringstraße, Vienna’s main boulevard. The most famous attraction in the park is the Johann Strauss Memorial.

Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum is not only home to one of the world’s largest collections of paintings, but you’ll also find decorative arts as well as artifacts from Egypt, the Antiquity and even Prehistoric artifacts.

The Heeresgeschichtliches Museum, Vienna’s Military Museum, traces the history of the Austrian Army from the start of the 30 Years’ War in 1618 until the end of the Second World War in 1945.

The Neue Burg was built as an expansion of the Hofburg, the imperial palace of the Habsburg rulers. The opulent building is now home to four museums: a weaponry museum, a museum of musical instruments, a museum of Ethnology and an archaeological museum.

Prater is a large recreational area best known for its amusement park and in particular its giant wheel. But Prater is also popular for its natural assets: meadows, streams and patches of woodland.

The Volksgarten, a public park near the imperial palace in Vienna, was created between 1820 and 1823 after the fortifications around the palace were torn down by Napoleon.

Zentralfriedhof is Vienna’s largest cemetery and the burial place of many of its famous former citizens including musicians such as Beethoven, Strauss and Brahms.

The Albertina is both a palace and a museum with a magnificent collection of graphic art that contains works from great artists such as Dürer, Michelangelo and Rubens. The lavish state rooms of the Albertina are also open to the public.

Vienna’s Botanical Garden was founded in 1754 by Empress Maria Theresa. Over the years it expanded to an 8 hectare large garden with some 9,000 plant species. Adjacent is the Alpengarten, an alpine garden.

UNO City, also known as Vienna International Center, is a complex of office towers created in the 1970s to house the administrations of several organizations of the United Nations.

Naschmarkt is the largest open air market in Vienna. There are plenty of stalls selling food, drinks and a whole range of different wares. It is also a popular place to have a quick bite to eat.

The Liechtenstein Palace was built in the early 18th century for Prince Liechtenstein. It is now home to a museum with a private collection of artwork displayed in a sumptuous Baroque decor.

Vienna attractions listed alphabetically

The Albertina is both a palace and a museum with a magnificent collection of graphic art that contains works from great artists such as Dürer, Michelangelo and Rubens. The lavish state rooms of the Albertina are also open to the public.

Am Hof is a large square in the center of Vienna. The square, originally the site of a castle, is now dominated by the white façade of the Kirche am Hof. In front of the 14th century church stands the black Marian Column.

The Belvedere is a magnificent baroque palace complex built in the early 18th century for Prince Eugène de Savoy. A trip to one of the museums allows visitors a chance to marvel at the magnificently decorated rooms.

Vienna’s Botanical Garden was founded in 1754 by Empress Maria Theresa. Over the years it expanded to an 8 hectare large garden with some 9,000 plant species. Adjacent is the Alpengarten, an alpine garden.

The Burggarten was created in the 19th century as a private garden for the imperial family. Highlights of the now public park include a statue of Mozart and a beautiful Palm House.

The Burgtheater is a grandiose structure built at the end of the 19th century to house the royal theater company , the second oldest still active theater company in Europe.

Freyung is a triangular square bordered by the Schottenkirche, a church originally built in the 12th century by Irish monks. At the center of the square is the Austria Fountain, installed here in 1846.

The Freyung Passage is a beautiful historic arcade linking the Freyung square with Herrengasse. It was built in 1860 as part of the Ferstel Palace and is home to a number of luxury stores.

Graben is a pedestrianized shopping street in the center of Vienna. In the middle of the street stands a Baroque monument erected here to commemorate the end of the Plague epidemic of 1679.

Heldenplatz is a spacious square near the former imperial palace of the Habsburg rulers. The square is named after two of Austria’s most famous war heroes, who are honored with large equestrian statues.

The Hofburg is an immense Imperial palace, built by generations of Habsburg rulers from the 13th century up to the early 20th century. It is home to a number of interesting museums such as the Schatzkammer.

This square is built on ruins of a Roman garrison, as evidenced by an underground museum. Other attractions are a baroque 18th century fountain and the Ankeruhr, a magnificent Jugendstil clock.

Between all the stately and formal buildings in Vienna, there are also some whimsical structures, most notably Hundertwasserhaus, a public housing unit converted by Hundertwasser into a colorful patchwork.

Karlsplatz is one of the largest squares in Vienna. Much of it is occupied by the Resselpark, where two beautiful former metro pavilions are located. Overlooking the park is Karlskirche, a glorious Baroque church.

The Liechtenstein Palace was built in the early 18th century for Prince Liechtenstein. It is now home to a museum with a private collection of artwork displayed in a sumptuous Baroque decor.

Maria-Theresien-Platz is a square that was laid out in the 19th century as part of an ambitious project to create a new museum complex. At the center stands a large monument dedicated to empress Maria Theresa.

Michaelerplatz is a square dominated by the Michaelertor, a grand archway leading to the heart of the Hofburg. Opposite are the modern Looshaus and the Michaelerkirche, one of Vienna’s oldest churches.

Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum is not only home to one of the world’s largest collections of paintings, but you’ll also find decorative arts as well as artifacts from Egypt, the Antiquity and even Prehistoric artifacts.

The Heeresgeschichtliches Museum, Vienna’s Military Museum, traces the history of the Austrian Army from the start of the 30 Years’ War in 1618 until the end of the Second World War in 1945.

The vast complex of the former imperial stables is now the site of a cluster of museums and cultural institutions as well as a number of cafés and shops, all arranged around an inviting inner courtyard.

Naschmarkt is the largest open air market in Vienna. There are plenty of stalls selling food, drinks and a whole range of different wares. It is also a popular place to have a quick bite to eat.

The Neue Burg was built as an expansion of the Hofburg, the imperial palace of the Habsburg rulers. The opulent building is now home to four museums: a weaponry museum, a museum of musical instruments, a museum of Ethnology and an archaeological museum.

Austria’s Parliament is seated in a monumental neoclassical building completed in 1884 for the former Reichsrat. In front of the central portico stands a colossal statue of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

The Peterskirche is a high baroque church with an overwhelming interior excessively decorated with gilded sculpture groups and magnificent ceiling frescoes.

Prater is a large recreational area best known for its amusement park and in particular its giant wheel. But Prater is also popular for its natural assets: meadows, streams and patches of woodland.

Vienna’s Neues Rathaus (new city hall) was built at the end of the 19th century in a Gothic Revival style. At the top of its 100 meter tall tower stands a statue known as the Rathausmann.

The Ringstraße is a boulevard created in the 19th century at the site of the former city fortifications. In a span of just two decades a host of magnificent buildings were erected here, from a city hall to an opera house.

The Schatzkammer – the imperial treasury chamber of the Habsburg dynasty – has a magnificent display of imperial symbols of power and wealth such as gem-studded crowns, orbs, scepters, and coronation mantles.

As soon as the Schönbrunn Palace was completed, it became the favorite residence of the Habsburg family. Its Schlosspark is a magnificent park with numerous monuments and fountains.

Schwarzenbergplatz is a vast square intersected by wide roads. There are several sights at the square including a fountain, a Soviet monument and a statue of the prince after whom the square was named.

Vienna’s opera house was constructed in 1869 as the Hofoper (court opera). The monumental building has a high renaissance design fronted by a beautiful Italianesque loggia.

The Stadtpark is a public park in Vienna, created in the mid 19th century along the Ringstraße, Vienna’s main boulevard. The most famous attraction in the park is the Johann Strauss Memorial.

Vienna’s Cathedral, the Gothic Stephansdom, was built in the 14th century at the site of an earlier church, of which two towers were incorporated. The majestic south tower still rises high over the city center.

UNO City, also known as Vienna International Center, is a complex of office towers created in the 1970s to house the administrations of several organizations of the United Nations.

The Volksgarten, a public park near the imperial palace in Vienna, was created between 1820 and 1823 after the fortifications around the palace were torn down by Napoleon.

Zentralfriedhof is Vienna’s largest cemetery and the burial place of many of its famous former citizens including musicians such as Beethoven, Strauss and Brahms.

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