Attractions in Hong Kong

Hong Kong attractions listed by popularity

Hong Kong Island’s impressive skyline becomes an even more spectacular sight at night, especially during the multimedia light show known as ‘Symphony of Lights’.

A funicular tram ride brings you to Victoria Peak, at 552 m (1800ft) the highest point on Hong Kong Island. It is a popular tourist attraction thanks to the spectacular views over Hong Kong’s skyline.

Despite modern competition from rail and road tunnels, the historic Star Ferry continues to be a popular means of crossing Victoria Harbour, especially with tourists.

The iconic 70-story Bank of China Tower – designed by American architect I.M. Pei as a stack of prisms – was Hong Kong’s tallest building when it was completed in 1990.

Built in 1950 as one of Hong Kong’s tallest and most prestigious buildings, the former Bank of China building is now dwarfed by the neighboring skyscrapers such as the HSBC Building.

When this 47 story, 180m (591ft) tall skyscraper was built in 1986 it was the world’s most expensive skyscraper. The unique building was designed by the renowned British architect Norman Foster.

This is probably the most charming temple in Hong Kong, best known for the many incense coils hanging from the ceiling. It is dedicated to two deities: the God of Literature and the God of War.

Wong Tai Sin Temple, a Taoist temple built in 1921, is one of Hong Kong’s most popular temples. Visitors come here to have their fortunes told and to make a wish at the altar.

The Lippo Centre is a twin-towered office complex located in Admiralty on Hong Kong Island. It is also known as the ‘Koala Building’, due to the cantilevered projections that seem to cling to the facade.

The neo-classical legislative Council Building is a beautiful remnant of Hong Kong’s colonial era. The domed building was designed by Sir Aston Webb and completed in 1912.

Statue Square – a pedestrianized refuge in crowded Central district – is a popular gathering place. The square is adorned with fountains and a statue of Sir Thomas Jackson.

Two IFC, a 415m / 1362ft tall skyscraper was built in 2003 on Hong Kong Island as the city’s tallest building, replacing the Central Plaza, which was built a decade earlier.

This skyscraper, completed in 1973, is known as ‘The House of a Thousand Orifices’ thanks to its 1700-plus round windows. The 52 story tower was once the tallest building in Asia.

This long, crowded boulevard in Kowloon is dubbed the ‘Golden Mile’ for its many neon signs. The road, which runs from the waterfront to Mongkok, is popular with visitors for the many shopping opportunities.

Located in Tsim Sha Tsui, Clock Tower is one of Hong Kong’s oldest landmarks. It was built on the site of the old Kowloon Station, which was part of the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

This popular park has several gardens, two playgrounds, a bird lake, sports amenities and many other attractions. It is a large park, especially for Kowloon where space is at a premium.

The botanical garden is strewn with a huge variety of tropical plants and trees. The relatively small zoological is home to several hundred birds, mammals and reptiles.

Known as the most crowded area in an already overcrowded Kowloon, Mongkok is busy day and night. The area is a shopper’s paradise, despite its reputation as the heartland of triad gangs.

Hong Kong Park, surrounded by a cluster of skyscrapers is located in Hong Kong’s busy Central district. The fairly new park – it opened in 1991 – has a large aviary with elevated walkways.

This promenade on Tsim Sha Tsui’s waterfront is Hong Kong’s version of Hollywood boulevard’s Walk of Fame. The avenue pays tribute to Hong Kong’s rich cinematic tradition.

The Peninsula Hotel, located in Kowloon and overlooking Victoria Harbour is one of the world’s most luxurious hotels. The Peninsula is famous for its fleet of Rolls-Royces.

Hong Kong attractions listed alphabetically

This promenade on Tsim Sha Tsui’s waterfront is Hong Kong’s version of Hollywood boulevard’s Walk of Fame. The avenue pays tribute to Hong Kong’s rich cinematic tradition.

The iconic 70-story Bank of China Tower – designed by American architect I.M. Pei as a stack of prisms – was Hong Kong’s tallest building when it was completed in 1990.

Located in Tsim Sha Tsui, Clock Tower is one of Hong Kong’s oldest landmarks. It was built on the site of the old Kowloon Station, which was part of the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

Hong Kong Park, surrounded by a cluster of skyscrapers is located in Hong Kong’s busy Central district. The fairly new park – it opened in 1991 – has a large aviary with elevated walkways.

When this 47 story, 180m (591ft) tall skyscraper was built in 1986 it was the world’s most expensive skyscraper. The unique building was designed by the renowned British architect Norman Foster.

This skyscraper, completed in 1973, is known as ‘The House of a Thousand Orifices’ thanks to its 1700-plus round windows. The 52 story tower was once the tallest building in Asia.

This popular park has several gardens, two playgrounds, a bird lake, sports amenities and many other attractions. It is a large park, especially for Kowloon where space is at a premium.

The neo-classical legislative Council Building is a beautiful remnant of Hong Kong’s colonial era. The domed building was designed by Sir Aston Webb and completed in 1912.

The Lippo Centre is a twin-towered office complex located in Admiralty on Hong Kong Island. It is also known as the ‘Koala Building’, due to the cantilevered projections that seem to cling to the facade.

This is probably the most charming temple in Hong Kong, best known for the many incense coils hanging from the ceiling. It is dedicated to two deities: the God of Literature and the God of War.

Known as the most crowded area in an already overcrowded Kowloon, Mongkok is busy day and night. The area is a shopper’s paradise, despite its reputation as the heartland of triad gangs.

This long, crowded boulevard in Kowloon is dubbed the ‘Golden Mile’ for its many neon signs. The road, which runs from the waterfront to Mongkok, is popular with visitors for the many shopping opportunities.

Built in 1950 as one of Hong Kong’s tallest and most prestigious buildings, the former Bank of China building is now dwarfed by the neighboring skyscrapers such as the HSBC Building.

The Peninsula Hotel, located in Kowloon and overlooking Victoria Harbour is one of the world’s most luxurious hotels. The Peninsula is famous for its fleet of Rolls-Royces.

Hong Kong Island’s impressive skyline becomes an even more spectacular sight at night, especially during the multimedia light show known as ‘Symphony of Lights’.

Despite modern competition from rail and road tunnels, the historic Star Ferry continues to be a popular means of crossing Victoria Harbour, especially with tourists.

Statue Square – a pedestrianized refuge in crowded Central district – is a popular gathering place. The square is adorned with fountains and a statue of Sir Thomas Jackson.

A funicular tram ride brings you to Victoria Peak, at 552 m (1800ft) the highest point on Hong Kong Island. It is a popular tourist attraction thanks to the spectacular views over Hong Kong’s skyline.

Two IFC, a 415m / 1362ft tall skyscraper was built in 2003 on Hong Kong Island as the city’s tallest building, replacing the Central Plaza, which was built a decade earlier.

Wong Tai Sin Temple, a Taoist temple built in 1921, is one of Hong Kong’s most popular temples. Visitors come here to have their fortunes told and to make a wish at the altar.

The botanical garden is strewn with a huge variety of tropical plants and trees. The relatively small zoological is home to several hundred birds, mammals and reptiles.

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