Attractions in Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg attractions listed by popularity

The Hermitage is one of the most famous museums in the world. Founded in 1764 by Catharine the Great, the museum is housed in the magnificent Winter palace and adjoining Hermitage buildings.

Peterhof is a magnificent country residence created in the early 18th century by tsar Peter the Great. Its Great Palace and expansive park adorned with fountains were to rival the splendor of Versailles.

St. Peterburg’s Palace Square is an enormous square in the heart of the historic city. It is an architectural showcase, surrounded by monumental buildings such as the Winter Palace and General Staff Building.

This remarkable church with colorful onion domes was built at the end of the 19th century in honor of the assassinated tsar Alexander II. The church was built in a classical Russian Revival style by Alfred Parland.

St. Isaac’s Cathedral was completed in 1858 after 40 years of construction. The magnificent cathedral with its enormous gilded dome is one of the largest in Europe.

The Rostral Columns were built in the early 19th century as beacons that guided ships into St. Petersburg’s port. The columns are adorned with prows, symbolizing naval supremacy.

The equestrian statue of Peter the Great at Senate Square is the most famous symbol of St. Petersburg. Its name stems from a poem by the great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.

The main collection of the Russian Museum is housed in the 19th century Mikhailovsky Palace. It gives an excellent overview of Russian art from the 12th through the 20th century.

The Admiralty is an enormous building originally created by Peter the Great as the country’s main shipyard. The current design with a central archway and gilded spire dates back to the early 19th century.

Nevsky Prospekt, a wide boulevard connecting the Admiralty Building with the Alexander Nevsky Monastery is Russia’s most famous boulevard. It is lined with magnificent palaces, churches and monuments.

The tombs of Peter the Great and most of his successors draw many visitors to this lavishly decorated Baroque church, built at the Peter and Paul Fortress in the early 18th century.

In 1703 Peter the Great ordered the construction of a fortress on a tiny island in the Neva Delta. It would be the nucleus of Russia’s new imperial capital, St. Petersburg.

The Cruiser Aurora is a naval ship famous for firing the first shot that triggered the October Revolution in 1917. The ship is now a museum, permanently anchored at the Neva river.

The Smolny Monastery was originally built in the 18th century for Elisabeth I, daughter of Peter the Great. A change in plans however put her not in the convent, but on the throne.

St. Isaac’s Square is surrounded by a number of magnificent building, not in the least the monumental St. Isaac’s Cathedral. At the center of the square stands a monument honoring Tsar Nicholas I.

Tsar Paul I, who feared a conspiracy against him, built a fortress-like residence to protect him against his political opponents. Just 40 days after moving in, he was murdered in his bedroom.

In 1703, shortly after founding St. Petersburg, Peter the great had a modest lodge cabin built for him. The small cabin, with only a couple of rooms, was built in just three days.

The Alexander Nevsky Monastery was built in the early 18th century to house the relics of of St Alexander Nevsky, a famous prince who defeated the Swedish army in the 13th century.

The Field of Mars, a former military parade and exercise ground, is now the site of a memorial honoring the victims of the revolutions of 1917 and the following civil war.

The Mariinsky Theatre opened in 1860 as St. Petersburg’s answer to Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre. Today it is still the city’s prime venue for opera and ballet performances.

The Kunstkammer was built between 1718 and 1734 to house St. Peterburg’s first museum of natural science where Peter the Great’s collection of natural curiosities were displayed.

The Bank Bridge, built in 1826 across the Griboyedov Canal, is one of the most magnificent of St. Petersburg’s many bridges. The pedestrian bridge is decorated with four large sculptures of Griffins.

Saint Petersburg attractions listed alphabetically

The Admiralty is an enormous building originally created by Peter the Great as the country’s main shipyard. The current design with a central archway and gilded spire dates back to the early 19th century.

The Alexander Nevsky Monastery was built in the early 18th century to house the relics of of St Alexander Nevsky, a famous prince who defeated the Swedish army in the 13th century.

The Cruiser Aurora is a naval ship famous for firing the first shot that triggered the October Revolution in 1917. The ship is now a museum, permanently anchored at the Neva river.

The Bank Bridge, built in 1826 across the Griboyedov Canal, is one of the most magnificent of St. Petersburg’s many bridges. The pedestrian bridge is decorated with four large sculptures of Griffins.

The equestrian statue of Peter the Great at Senate Square is the most famous symbol of St. Petersburg. Its name stems from a poem by the great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.

In 1703, shortly after founding St. Petersburg, Peter the great had a modest lodge cabin built for him. The small cabin, with only a couple of rooms, was built in just three days.

This remarkable church with colorful onion domes was built at the end of the 19th century in honor of the assassinated tsar Alexander II. The church was built in a classical Russian Revival style by Alfred Parland.

The Field of Mars, a former military parade and exercise ground, is now the site of a memorial honoring the victims of the revolutions of 1917 and the following civil war.

The Hermitage is one of the most famous museums in the world. Founded in 1764 by Catharine the Great, the museum is housed in the magnificent Winter palace and adjoining Hermitage buildings.

The Kunstkammer was built between 1718 and 1734 to house St. Peterburg’s first museum of natural science where Peter the Great’s collection of natural curiosities were displayed.

The Mariinsky Theatre opened in 1860 as St. Petersburg’s answer to Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre. Today it is still the city’s prime venue for opera and ballet performances.

Tsar Paul I, who feared a conspiracy against him, built a fortress-like residence to protect him against his political opponents. Just 40 days after moving in, he was murdered in his bedroom.

Nevsky Prospekt, a wide boulevard connecting the Admiralty Building with the Alexander Nevsky Monastery is Russia’s most famous boulevard. It is lined with magnificent palaces, churches and monuments.

St. Peterburg’s Palace Square is an enormous square in the heart of the historic city. It is an architectural showcase, surrounded by monumental buildings such as the Winter Palace and General Staff Building.

The tombs of Peter the Great and most of his successors draw many visitors to this lavishly decorated Baroque church, built at the Peter and Paul Fortress in the early 18th century.

In 1703 Peter the Great ordered the construction of a fortress on a tiny island in the Neva Delta. It would be the nucleus of Russia’s new imperial capital, St. Petersburg.

Peterhof is a magnificent country residence created in the early 18th century by tsar Peter the Great. Its Great Palace and expansive park adorned with fountains were to rival the splendor of Versailles.

The Rostral Columns were built in the early 19th century as beacons that guided ships into St. Petersburg’s port. The columns are adorned with prows, symbolizing naval supremacy.

The main collection of the Russian Museum is housed in the 19th century Mikhailovsky Palace. It gives an excellent overview of Russian art from the 12th through the 20th century.

The Smolny Monastery was originally built in the 18th century for Elisabeth I, daughter of Peter the Great. A change in plans however put her not in the convent, but on the throne.

St. Isaac’s Cathedral was completed in 1858 after 40 years of construction. The magnificent cathedral with its enormous gilded dome is one of the largest in Europe.

St. Isaac’s Square is surrounded by a number of magnificent building, not in the least the monumental St. Isaac’s Cathedral. At the center of the square stands a monument honoring Tsar Nicholas I.

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