Attractions in Seville

Seville attractions listed by popularity

The Royal Palace of Seville, known as Real Alcazar, is a magnificent architectural complex with intricately decorated halls laid out around delightful patios. The walled-in gardens are just as diverse as the palace.

Seville’s magnificent cathedral, built in the 15th century, is one of the largest in the world. The gothic interior of the church is magnificent, and the huge gilded altarpiece is simply breathtaking.

Sevilla’s principal park, the Parque de Maria Luisa, is located just south of the city’s historic center. The park’s main attractions are the pavilions that were built for the Ibero-American fair of 1929.

The Torre del Oro or Tower of Gold was built in the early 13th century as a watchtower by the Almohades, who at the time ruled the region. The tower is now home to a naval museum.

The Giralda, the bell tower of the cathedral of Seville, was originally erected at the end of the 12th century as the minaret of a mosque built by the Moors. The beautiful belfry was added in the mid 16th century.

The Plaza de Espana is a harmonious complex built in 1929 as the centerpiece of the 1929 Ibero-American exposition. It is decorated with 58 ceramic tiled benches representing Spanish provinces.

The Alamillo Bridge is the most spectacular of a series of bridges built for the 1992 Expo in Seville. The design of the cable stayed bridge with a single non-supported pylon was groundbreaking at the time.

The Plaza Virgen de los Reyes is a historic square surrounded by historic buildings. It is dominated by the famous bell tower of Seville’s Cathedral, the Giralda.

The Casa de Pilatos is one of the most interesting buildings in Seville. Built in the early 16th century as the palace for the Marquis of Tarifa, it is a showcase of Renaissance, Gothic and Mudejar architecture.

The 18th century Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza is one of the oldest and most famous of all bullrings in Spain. Inside the graceful structure is the Museum of the History of Bullfights.

The former Royal Tobacco Factory is now the seat of the University of Seville. The 18th century building is enormous, and was protected by sentries, moats and drawbridges.

In the 12th century Seville was considered Europe’s best fortified city thanks to a 6km long wall that encircled the whole of Seville. A 400 meter long section of this historic wall survived.

The Palace of San Telmo was built in the 17th century as a school for navigators. It became a palace in 1849, when it was purchased by the Duke of Montpensier. The most striking feature is the baroque portal.

Seville’s iconic modern Metropol Parasol was built between 2005 and 2011. The structure, with its large wooden canopy, is home to an archaeological museum, a market hall, an elevated plaza and a viewing platform.

The Museo de Belles Artes in Seville is one of the most important museums of fine arts in Spain. Its collection of mostly Spanish paintings and sculptures is housed in a former 17th century monastery.

A former hospital complex, built in the 16th century, now serves as the seat of the Parliament of Andalusia. A baroque portal leads to the largest of an impressive number of eight courtyards.

Seville’s Ayuntamiento or City Hall was built in the early 16th century in a local version of the Renaissance style. It is best known for its intricate west façade and magnificently decorated rooms.

Seville attractions listed alphabetically

The Alamillo Bridge is the most spectacular of a series of bridges built for the 1992 Expo in Seville. The design of the cable stayed bridge with a single non-supported pylon was groundbreaking at the time.

The Casa de Pilatos is one of the most interesting buildings in Seville. Built in the early 16th century as the palace for the Marquis of Tarifa, it is a showcase of Renaissance, Gothic and Mudejar architecture.

Seville’s magnificent cathedral, built in the 15th century, is one of the largest in the world. The gothic interior of the church is magnificent, and the huge gilded altarpiece is simply breathtaking.

Seville’s Ayuntamiento or City Hall was built in the early 16th century in a local version of the Renaissance style. It is best known for its intricate west façade and magnificently decorated rooms.

The Giralda, the bell tower of the cathedral of Seville, was originally erected at the end of the 12th century as the minaret of a mosque built by the Moors. The beautiful belfry was added in the mid 16th century.

The Torre del Oro or Tower of Gold was built in the early 13th century as a watchtower by the Almohades, who at the time ruled the region. The tower is now home to a naval museum.

Sevilla’s principal park, the Parque de Maria Luisa, is located just south of the city’s historic center. The park’s main attractions are the pavilions that were built for the Ibero-American fair of 1929.

Seville’s iconic modern Metropol Parasol was built between 2005 and 2011. The structure, with its large wooden canopy, is home to an archaeological museum, a market hall, an elevated plaza and a viewing platform.

In the 12th century Seville was considered Europe’s best fortified city thanks to a 6km long wall that encircled the whole of Seville. A 400 meter long section of this historic wall survived.

The Museo de Belles Artes in Seville is one of the most important museums of fine arts in Spain. Its collection of mostly Spanish paintings and sculptures is housed in a former 17th century monastery.

A former hospital complex, built in the 16th century, now serves as the seat of the Parliament of Andalusia. A baroque portal leads to the largest of an impressive number of eight courtyards.

The Plaza de Espana is a harmonious complex built in 1929 as the centerpiece of the 1929 Ibero-American exposition. It is decorated with 58 ceramic tiled benches representing Spanish provinces.

The 18th century Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza is one of the oldest and most famous of all bullrings in Spain. Inside the graceful structure is the Museum of the History of Bullfights.

The Plaza Virgen de los Reyes is a historic square surrounded by historic buildings. It is dominated by the famous bell tower of Seville’s Cathedral, the Giralda.

The Royal Palace of Seville, known as Real Alcazar, is a magnificent architectural complex with intricately decorated halls laid out around delightful patios. The walled-in gardens are just as diverse as the palace.

The former Royal Tobacco Factory is now the seat of the University of Seville. The 18th century building is enormous, and was protected by sentries, moats and drawbridges.

The Palace of San Telmo was built in the 17th century as a school for navigators. It became a palace in 1849, when it was purchased by the Duke of Montpensier. The most striking feature is the baroque portal.

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