Attractions in Rome

Rome attractions listed by popularity

The most famous building of the Roman Empire is probably the Colosseum. The building accommodated more than 55,000 spectators and was home to many games featuring gladiators and wild animals.

The Pantheon was built in 118 AD by Emperor Hadrian as a temple for all pagan gods. The building’s immense dome was the largest dome in the world for more than thirteen centuries.

This museum complex houses one of the world’s most important collections brought together by popes over a period of four centuries, with the Sistine Chapel as its largest crowd puller.

The largest church in the world, this great building with Michelangelo’s impressive dome is the center of Christianity. The opulent interior bears testimony to the wealth of the Catholic church in the 16th and 17th century.

Rome’s most spectacular fountain is the Fontana del Trevi or Trevi Fountain. The large 18th century fountain occupies a small square which is usually packed with tourists.

As the de facto heart of Ancient Rome, the Forum boasted plenty of temples, arches and basilicas. Most are now reduced to rubble but with some imagination you can see the Roman Empire come back to life.

The Piazza di Spagna is one of the most popular tourist locations in Rome. The famous Spanish Steps lead from the square to the Trinità dei Monti, a beautiful French church.

The long Navona square follows the oval shape of the former Domitian stadium. It contains no less than three beautiful fountains, built during the 16th and 17th centuries.

Villa Borghese, located just north of the Spanish Steps, is the largest public park in Rome. Created in the early 17th century, it features a lake, temples, fountains, statues and several museums.

According to Roman mythology, Romulus founded the city of Rome on this hill in 800 BC after he slayed his twin brother Remus. Centuries later Rome’s emperors built expansive palaces on the hill.

The Arch of Titus is one of two remaining arches on the Forum Romanum. It was built between 81 and 85 AD to commemorate the capture of Jerusalem over the Jewish Zealots.

The Baths of Caracalla was the largest thermae in the world when it opened in 217 AD. More than 1600 people could be accommodated in this Roman version of a leisure center.

Piazza del Campidoglio is a central square in Rome, laid out after designs by Michelangelo. The Renaissance facades of the surrounding buildings were also designed by the Italian master.

Castel Sant’Angelo was originally built in 123 AD by Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum, but it was later turned into a fortified castle used by the papacy as a refuge in case of danger.

Via Appia Antica or the Appian Way is the most famous of the many roads that radiated from Rome. It was built in 312 BC and led all the way to Brindisi in the southeast of Italy.

The Arch of Constantine, located right next to the Colosseum, is the largest of the remaining Roman triumphal arches. It was built in 315 AD after Constantine’s surprising victory over Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge.

Piazza del Popolo is a large oval square near the Borghese park. In the middle of the square stands a 3300 year old obelisk taken from the Sun Temple in Egypt by Emperor Augustus.

This enormous monument honors Italy’s first king, Victor Emmanuel II. It was built on a slope of the Capitoline Hill, at the heart of the city. The monument was inaugurated in 1911, 50 years after the unification of Italy.

In 113 AD a 42m (138ft) tall column was erected in honor of Emperor Trajan. A long winding band of reliefs on the column depicts the victories of Emperor Trajan in the Dacian Wars.

What was started by Caesar as an extension of the Roman Forum became the city’s most important political and economical center with temples, public squares, libraries, markets and a basilica.

The Arch of Septimius Severus was built in 203 AD as a triumphal arch to commemorate the victories of Emperor Severus in Parthia. It is one of the best preserved monuments on the Forum Romanum.

Piazza Venezia is a central square in Rome, surrounded by several landmark buildings, including Palazzo Venezia and the Vittoriano Monument, honoring Italy’s first king.

Once the center of Catholicism, the Basilica of St. John Lateran is now the cathedral where the pope officiates as bishop of Rome. Inside you’ll find twelve colossal statues of the apostles.

Trajan’s Forum was built between 106 and 113 AD as the last and greatest of the Imperial Forums. The complex included a basilica, two libraries as well as a column and a temple dedicated to Trajan.

The Roman equivalent of today’s modern shopping mall, this 2nd century complex housed 150 shops, warehouses and offices. Unlike the adjacent Forum of Trajan, the markets are relatively well preserved.

The Sistine Chapel, a private chapel in the Vatican, is world famous for its magnificent ceiling painting, a masterpiece of Western art created in the early sixteenth century by Michelangelo.

The Theater of Marcellus was conceived by Julius Caesar but eventually built by Emperor Augustus in 13 BC. It was the largest theater in ancient Rome, seating more than 12,000 spectators.

Vatican City or ‘Holy See’ – the world’s smallest state – is completely enclosed by the city of Rome. It incorporates the St. Peter’s Basilica as well as the Vatican Museums and adjacent gardens.

One of Rome’s best museums, spread over two palazzos standing on either side of the Campidoglio Square. The museums boast a large collection of Roman sculpture as well as a picture gallery.

The Palazzo Doria Pamphilj is a large palace in the center of Rome, home to one of the city’s most famous art galleries: the Galleria Doria Pamphilj. The palazzo has opulently decorated rooms and is worth a visit on its own.

The Church of San Pietro in Vincoli (St. Peter in Chains) is named for the chains that held St. Peter when he was imprisoned. The church is best known for Michelangelo’s famous statue of Moses.

The Palazzo Altemps, a sixteenth century palace, is the setting for a department of the National Roman Museum. Here you find a superb selection of mainly Roman statues, many of them from the renowned Ludovisi Collection

This luxurious and expansive countryside residence near Tivoli was built by emperor Hadrian from 118 until 133 AD. The enormous estate contains temples, theatres, thermae and other historic buildings.

This elliptical piazza was created in the 17th century by the renowned sculptor and architect Bernini as a grand entrance to the St. Peter’s Basilica. The Egyptian obelisk at the center of the square was installed earlier, in 1586.

This 36 meter tall pyramid was built by praetor Caius Cestius as his tomb. It was built about a decade after the Roman Empire had conquered Egypt and all things Egyptian had become in vogue.

Piazza Barberini is a heavily trafficked square featuring two nice fountains, the Triton Fountain and the Fountain of Bees, both created in the 17th century by the renowned sculptor Bernini.

The Ara Pacis (Altar of Peace) was built by Emperor Augustus in 9 BC after the conquest of Gaul and Hispania. The altar was one of Rome’s most important monuments.

The Aurelian Wall was built in the third century AD to defend Rome against the ever growing threat of Germanic tribes invading the Roman Empire. About two-thirds of this nineteen km (12 mile) long wall is still intact.

In 28 BC Emperor Augustus built a large mausoleum in white marble. The ashes of many members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, including those of emperors Augustus, Tiberius and Claudius were deposited here.

The complex of the Baths of Diocletianus, built in 306, was the largest thermae in all of Ancient Rome. Remains of the baths are now integrated in other structures such as churches and a cloister.

Palazzo Massimo, a large nineteenth century building, houses a fabulous collection of Roman statues, mosaics, frescoes, coins and jewelry. It is one of the world’s most important museums of Roman art.

The Forum Boarium, once the site of the city’s cattle market dates back to ancient Rome’s republican times. Two temples of that era survived: the Temple of Herculus and the Temple of Portunus.

During the Middle Ages, this was one of Rome’s busiest squares. Today the Campo de’ Fiori is still a lively square thanks in part to its daily market. A statue at the center commemorates one of many people executed here.

In 1849 Garibaldi’s troops confronted the French here on the Janiculum. The park on top of the hill is littered with monuments celebrating the Italian patriot and his comrades.

EUR

EUR is modern district in Rome, originally created in the 1930s for the cancelled World Exposition of 1942. It was built as a showcase of Fascist architecture, most of which can still be seen today.

Just 11 columns remain of the original Temple of Hadrian. It is now integrated in Rome’s 17th century exchange building, located at the Piazza di Pietra, a small square in the heart of Rome.

Since ancient times this small island in the Tiber River has been associated with health. In 291 BC a temple was built here in honor of Aesculapius, god of medicine and healing.

The highlights of this museum of the civilization of Rome are a large scale model of Imperial Rome and the reliefs of Trajan’s Column. The museum is located in EUR, a suburb south of Rome.

The column of Marcus Aurelius was erected between 180 and 193 AD to commemorate the victories of Emperor Marcus Aurelius in his campaigns against Germanic tribes and the Sarmatians.

A winding road leads from the Piazza del Popolo to these gardens on top of the Pincio Hill. The gardens feature a couple of attractions such as an obelisk and water clock, but it’s also popular for its beautiful views over Rome.

The Basilica of Saint Mary Major is one of Rome’s four papal basilicas and the largest church in the city dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The church was built in the fifth century.

Situated on top of Rome’s highest hill, this piazza offers great views over the city. The president’s official residence borders this large square. At its center sits an obelisk flanked by sculptures of Castor and Pollux.

Unearthed between 1926 and 1928, this was the site of a once important religious complex with four temples built in the Republican era, between the 4th and the 2nd century BC.

A long flight of marble steps leads up to this church built on top of the Capitoline Hill. The roots of this church go back to the sixth century, when it was built at the site of the ancient Temple of Juno.

This square near the center of medieval Rome is dominated by the Palazzo Farnese, a magnificent Renaissance palace built in the 16th century for the Farnese family.

The Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of Rome’s oldest churches, first built in the third century. The church, located on Rome’s west bank, is best known for its magnificent mosaics from the twelfth century.

This Baroque church, a model of counter-reformation architecture, is the world’s oldest Jesuit church and one of the most famous churches in Rome. The interior is decorated with magnificent frescoes.

This small church at the Forum Boarium is best known for its beautiful Cosmatesque interior and for the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) that stands against a wall in the church’s portico.

This long straight road – unusual at the time – was laid out in the early 16th century by Donato Bramante. It was long one of Rome’s most prestigious streets and influential citizens built lavish houses along the street.

This church is one of the four major basilicas in Rome. It was originally built in the fourth century and was the largest church in Rome until the completion of the current St. Peter’s Basilica.

The Mouth of Truth is a famous marble disc in the shape of an enormous face. According to a medieval legend, the mouth would close if someone put their hand in it and tell a lie, so it was used as some kind of lie detector.

Villa Farnesina was built as a country retreat for the Sienese banker Agostino Chigi. The villa is famous for its interior that boasts an abundance of frescoes, including several designed by Raphael.

The former Montemartini power station is now a branch of the Capitoline Museums. The huge boiler and engines inside provide an interesting contrast with the ancient art that is on display here.

The Fountain of Moses is a monumental fountain created in the late 16th century on the request of pope Sixtus V. The fountain is named for a large statue of the biblical figure of Moses.

The Arch of Janus is a four-sided arch that was built during the reign of Emperor Constantine over the intersection of two roads. It provided shelter for cattle merchants at the nearby market.

The Roman Senate assembled at the Curia, one of the best preserved buildings of the Forum Romanum. The interior was completely clad in marble and even had a gilded ceiling. Today, only the colorful marble floor is still intact.

The Aventine is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. The hill is know for its magnificent views over the city, but there are also some interesting sights such as the Santa Sabina church and a rose garden.

The Orto Botanico is a 12 hectare (30 acre) large botanical garden in Trastevere, just across the river from Rome’s historic center. It contains among others a medicinal garden, a bamboo grove and a Japanese garden.

The Capitoline Hill was the political and religious center of the Roman Empire. Here stood the majestic Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, one of the most important temples of the antiquity.

The Fountain of the Four Rivers is the centerpiece of the Navona Square. The acclaimed design by Bernini shows four large figures, allegorical representations of what were considered the four greatest rivers in the world.

The Holy Stairs are the stairs on which Jesus is said to have walked on his way to the house of Pontius Pilate. Today they lead to the Sancta Sanctorum, a chapel with important relics.

The baptistery near the Lateran Basilica is the oldest in Rome. Its interior is richly decorated in Baroque style. Even more interesting are the chapels of the baptistery where you can admire mosaics from the fifth to seventh centuries.

Ponte Sant’Angelo is a beautiful bridge over the Tiber river, originally built by Emperor Hadrian in 136 AD. In the 17th century the bridge was embellished with ten statues of angels designed by Bernini.

The Porta Maggiore was built in 52 AD by Emperor Claudius as part of a network of aqueducts. The structure was later incorporated in the Aurelian Wall around the city.

The Porticus of Octavia was a grand courtyard enclosed by a double colonnade. Inside stood two marble temples. The porticus was named for Octavia, the sister of Emperor Augustus.

The Cimitero Acattolico, better known as the Protestant Cemetery, is a cemetery for non-Catholics in Rome. It contains many graves of prominent artists, including those of poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

The church of Sant’Ignazio di Loyola was built in the 17th century by the Jesuits. It is best known for the magnificent ceiling frescoes that glorify the founder of the Jesuit order, St. Ignatius.

The Santa Maria degli Angeli, the Church of Saint Mary of the Angels, was built in the sixteenth century by Michelangelo, who integrated it into an ancient Roman bath complex.

The church of Santa Maria del Popolo was built at the spot were once – according to local lore – Nero’s spirit haunted. The church is best known for its Renaissance-style chapels.

The Santa Maria della Vittoria (Saint Mary of Victory) is one of Rome’s most opulent Baroque churches. It is best known for a marble sculpture of Bernini, known as the ‘Ecstasy of Teresa’.

The exterior of the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva may look unassuming, but the interior is well worth a visit. It’s the only medieval Gothic church in Rome and there are many interesting tombs and chapels inside.

Santa Prassede is a church known for its many mosaic decorations that were created in the early ninth century by Byzantine artists. The chapel of Zeno, completely covered with mosaics, is particularly impressive.

Rome attractions listed alphabetically

Via Appia Antica or the Appian Way is the most famous of the many roads that radiated from Rome. It was built in 312 BC and led all the way to Brindisi in the southeast of Italy.

The Ara Pacis (Altar of Peace) was built by Emperor Augustus in 9 BC after the conquest of Gaul and Hispania. The altar was one of Rome’s most important monuments.

The Arch of Constantine, located right next to the Colosseum, is the largest of the remaining Roman triumphal arches. It was built in 315 AD after Constantine’s surprising victory over Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge.

The Arch of Janus is a four-sided arch that was built during the reign of Emperor Constantine over the intersection of two roads. It provided shelter for cattle merchants at the nearby market.

The Arch of Septimius Severus was built in 203 AD as a triumphal arch to commemorate the victories of Emperor Severus in Parthia. It is one of the best preserved monuments on the Forum Romanum.

The Arch of Titus is one of two remaining arches on the Forum Romanum. It was built between 81 and 85 AD to commemorate the capture of Jerusalem over the Jewish Zealots.

Unearthed between 1926 and 1928, this was the site of a once important religious complex with four temples built in the Republican era, between the 4th and the 2nd century BC.

The Aurelian Wall was built in the third century AD to defend Rome against the ever growing threat of Germanic tribes invading the Roman Empire. About two-thirds of this nineteen km (12 mile) long wall is still intact.

The Aventine is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. The hill is know for its magnificent views over the city, but there are also some interesting sights such as the Santa Sabina church and a rose garden.

The Baths of Caracalla was the largest thermae in the world when it opened in 217 AD. More than 1600 people could be accommodated in this Roman version of a leisure center.

The complex of the Baths of Diocletianus, built in 306, was the largest thermae in all of Ancient Rome. Remains of the baths are now integrated in other structures such as churches and a cloister.

The Orto Botanico is a 12 hectare (30 acre) large botanical garden in Trastevere, just across the river from Rome’s historic center. It contains among others a medicinal garden, a bamboo grove and a Japanese garden.

During the Middle Ages, this was one of Rome’s busiest squares. Today the Campo de’ Fiori is still a lively square thanks in part to its daily market. A statue at the center commemorates one of many people executed here.

The Capitoline Hill was the political and religious center of the Roman Empire. Here stood the majestic Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, one of the most important temples of the antiquity.

One of Rome’s best museums, spread over two palazzos standing on either side of the Campidoglio Square. The museums boast a large collection of Roman sculpture as well as a picture gallery.

Castel Sant’Angelo was originally built in 123 AD by Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum, but it was later turned into a fortified castle used by the papacy as a refuge in case of danger.

The former Montemartini power station is now a branch of the Capitoline Museums. The huge boiler and engines inside provide an interesting contrast with the ancient art that is on display here.

The most famous building of the Roman Empire is probably the Colosseum. The building accommodated more than 55,000 spectators and was home to many games featuring gladiators and wild animals.

The column of Marcus Aurelius was erected between 180 and 193 AD to commemorate the victories of Emperor Marcus Aurelius in his campaigns against Germanic tribes and the Sarmatians.

The Roman Senate assembled at the Curia, one of the best preserved buildings of the Forum Romanum. The interior was completely clad in marble and even had a gilded ceiling. Today, only the colorful marble floor is still intact.

EUR

EUR is modern district in Rome, originally created in the 1930s for the cancelled World Exposition of 1942. It was built as a showcase of Fascist architecture, most of which can still be seen today.

The Forum Boarium, once the site of the city’s cattle market dates back to ancient Rome’s republican times. Two temples of that era survived: the Temple of Herculus and the Temple of Portunus.

Trajan’s Forum was built between 106 and 113 AD as the last and greatest of the Imperial Forums. The complex included a basilica, two libraries as well as a column and a temple dedicated to Trajan.

As the de facto heart of Ancient Rome, the Forum boasted plenty of temples, arches and basilicas. Most are now reduced to rubble but with some imagination you can see the Roman Empire come back to life.

The Fountain of Moses is a monumental fountain created in the late 16th century on the request of pope Sixtus V. The fountain is named for a large statue of the biblical figure of Moses.

The Fountain of the Four Rivers is the centerpiece of the Navona Square. The acclaimed design by Bernini shows four large figures, allegorical representations of what were considered the four greatest rivers in the world.

This Baroque church, a model of counter-reformation architecture, is the world’s oldest Jesuit church and one of the most famous churches in Rome. The interior is decorated with magnificent frescoes.

This luxurious and expansive countryside residence near Tivoli was built by emperor Hadrian from 118 until 133 AD. The enormous estate contains temples, theatres, thermae and other historic buildings.

The Holy Stairs are the stairs on which Jesus is said to have walked on his way to the house of Pontius Pilate. Today they lead to the Sancta Sanctorum, a chapel with important relics.

What was started by Caesar as an extension of the Roman Forum became the city’s most important political and economical center with temples, public squares, libraries, markets and a basilica.

In 1849 Garibaldi’s troops confronted the French here on the Janiculum. The park on top of the hill is littered with monuments celebrating the Italian patriot and his comrades.

The baptistery near the Lateran Basilica is the oldest in Rome. Its interior is richly decorated in Baroque style. Even more interesting are the chapels of the baptistery where you can admire mosaics from the fifth to seventh centuries.

In 28 BC Emperor Augustus built a large mausoleum in white marble. The ashes of many members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, including those of emperors Augustus, Tiberius and Claudius were deposited here.

The Mouth of Truth is a famous marble disc in the shape of an enormous face. According to a medieval legend, the mouth would close if someone put their hand in it and tell a lie, so it was used as some kind of lie detector.

The highlights of this museum of the civilization of Rome are a large scale model of Imperial Rome and the reliefs of Trajan’s Column. The museum is located in EUR, a suburb south of Rome.

According to Roman mythology, Romulus founded the city of Rome on this hill in 800 BC after he slayed his twin brother Remus. Centuries later Rome’s emperors built expansive palaces on the hill.

The Palazzo Altemps, a sixteenth century palace, is the setting for a department of the National Roman Museum. Here you find a superb selection of mainly Roman statues, many of them from the renowned Ludovisi Collection

The Palazzo Doria Pamphilj is a large palace in the center of Rome, home to one of the city’s most famous art galleries: the Galleria Doria Pamphilj. The palazzo has opulently decorated rooms and is worth a visit on its own.

Palazzo Massimo, a large nineteenth century building, houses a fabulous collection of Roman statues, mosaics, frescoes, coins and jewelry. It is one of the world’s most important museums of Roman art.

The Pantheon was built in 118 AD by Emperor Hadrian as a temple for all pagan gods. The building’s immense dome was the largest dome in the world for more than thirteen centuries.

Piazza Barberini is a heavily trafficked square featuring two nice fountains, the Triton Fountain and the Fountain of Bees, both created in the 17th century by the renowned sculptor Bernini.

Piazza del Campidoglio is a central square in Rome, laid out after designs by Michelangelo. The Renaissance facades of the surrounding buildings were also designed by the Italian master.

Piazza del Popolo is a large oval square near the Borghese park. In the middle of the square stands a 3300 year old obelisk taken from the Sun Temple in Egypt by Emperor Augustus.

Situated on top of Rome’s highest hill, this piazza offers great views over the city. The president’s official residence borders this large square. At its center sits an obelisk flanked by sculptures of Castor and Pollux.

The Piazza di Spagna is one of the most popular tourist locations in Rome. The famous Spanish Steps lead from the square to the Trinità dei Monti, a beautiful French church.

This square near the center of medieval Rome is dominated by the Palazzo Farnese, a magnificent Renaissance palace built in the 16th century for the Farnese family.

The long Navona square follows the oval shape of the former Domitian stadium. It contains no less than three beautiful fountains, built during the 16th and 17th centuries.

Piazza Venezia is a central square in Rome, surrounded by several landmark buildings, including Palazzo Venezia and the Vittoriano Monument, honoring Italy’s first king.

A winding road leads from the Piazza del Popolo to these gardens on top of the Pincio Hill. The gardens feature a couple of attractions such as an obelisk and water clock, but it’s also popular for its beautiful views over Rome.

Ponte Sant’Angelo is a beautiful bridge over the Tiber river, originally built by Emperor Hadrian in 136 AD. In the 17th century the bridge was embellished with ten statues of angels designed by Bernini.

The Porta Maggiore was built in 52 AD by Emperor Claudius as part of a network of aqueducts. The structure was later incorporated in the Aurelian Wall around the city.

The Porticus of Octavia was a grand courtyard enclosed by a double colonnade. Inside stood two marble temples. The porticus was named for Octavia, the sister of Emperor Augustus.

The Cimitero Acattolico, better known as the Protestant Cemetery, is a cemetery for non-Catholics in Rome. It contains many graves of prominent artists, including those of poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

This 36 meter tall pyramid was built by praetor Caius Cestius as his tomb. It was built about a decade after the Roman Empire had conquered Egypt and all things Egyptian had become in vogue.

The church of Sant’Ignazio di Loyola was built in the 17th century by the Jesuits. It is best known for the magnificent ceiling frescoes that glorify the founder of the Jesuit order, St. Ignatius.

The Santa Maria degli Angeli, the Church of Saint Mary of the Angels, was built in the sixteenth century by Michelangelo, who integrated it into an ancient Roman bath complex.

The church of Santa Maria del Popolo was built at the spot were once – according to local lore – Nero’s spirit haunted. The church is best known for its Renaissance-style chapels.

The Santa Maria della Vittoria (Saint Mary of Victory) is one of Rome’s most opulent Baroque churches. It is best known for a marble sculpture of Bernini, known as the ‘Ecstasy of Teresa’.

A long flight of marble steps leads up to this church built on top of the Capitoline Hill. The roots of this church go back to the sixth century, when it was built at the site of the ancient Temple of Juno.

This small church at the Forum Boarium is best known for its beautiful Cosmatesque interior and for the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) that stands against a wall in the church’s portico.

The Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of Rome’s oldest churches, first built in the third century. The church, located on Rome’s west bank, is best known for its magnificent mosaics from the twelfth century.

The exterior of the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva may look unassuming, but the interior is well worth a visit. It’s the only medieval Gothic church in Rome and there are many interesting tombs and chapels inside.

Santa Prassede is a church known for its many mosaic decorations that were created in the early ninth century by Byzantine artists. The chapel of Zeno, completely covered with mosaics, is particularly impressive.

The Sistine Chapel, a private chapel in the Vatican, is world famous for its magnificent ceiling painting, a masterpiece of Western art created in the early sixteenth century by Michelangelo.

Once the center of Catholicism, the Basilica of St. John Lateran is now the cathedral where the pope officiates as bishop of Rome. Inside you’ll find twelve colossal statues of the apostles.

The Basilica of Saint Mary Major is one of Rome’s four papal basilicas and the largest church in the city dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The church was built in the fifth century.

This church is one of the four major basilicas in Rome. It was originally built in the fourth century and was the largest church in Rome until the completion of the current St. Peter’s Basilica.

The Church of San Pietro in Vincoli (St. Peter in Chains) is named for the chains that held St. Peter when he was imprisoned. The church is best known for Michelangelo’s famous statue of Moses.

The largest church in the world, this great building with Michelangelo’s impressive dome is the center of Christianity. The opulent interior bears testimony to the wealth of the Catholic church in the 16th and 17th century.

This elliptical piazza was created in the 17th century by the renowned sculptor and architect Bernini as a grand entrance to the St. Peter’s Basilica. The Egyptian obelisk at the center of the square was installed earlier, in 1586.

Just 11 columns remain of the original Temple of Hadrian. It is now integrated in Rome’s 17th century exchange building, located at the Piazza di Pietra, a small square in the heart of Rome.

The Theater of Marcellus was conceived by Julius Caesar but eventually built by Emperor Augustus in 13 BC. It was the largest theater in ancient Rome, seating more than 12,000 spectators.

Since ancient times this small island in the Tiber River has been associated with health. In 291 BC a temple was built here in honor of Aesculapius, god of medicine and healing.

In 113 AD a 42m (138ft) tall column was erected in honor of Emperor Trajan. A long winding band of reliefs on the column depicts the victories of Emperor Trajan in the Dacian Wars.

The Roman equivalent of today’s modern shopping mall, this 2nd century complex housed 150 shops, warehouses and offices. Unlike the adjacent Forum of Trajan, the markets are relatively well preserved.

Rome’s most spectacular fountain is the Fontana del Trevi or Trevi Fountain. The large 18th century fountain occupies a small square which is usually packed with tourists.

Vatican City or ‘Holy See’ – the world’s smallest state – is completely enclosed by the city of Rome. It incorporates the St. Peter’s Basilica as well as the Vatican Museums and adjacent gardens.

This museum complex houses one of the world’s most important collections brought together by popes over a period of four centuries, with the Sistine Chapel as its largest crowd puller.

This long straight road – unusual at the time – was laid out in the early 16th century by Donato Bramante. It was long one of Rome’s most prestigious streets and influential citizens built lavish houses along the street.

This enormous monument honors Italy’s first king, Victor Emmanuel II. It was built on a slope of the Capitoline Hill, at the heart of the city. The monument was inaugurated in 1911, 50 years after the unification of Italy.

Villa Borghese, located just north of the Spanish Steps, is the largest public park in Rome. Created in the early 17th century, it features a lake, temples, fountains, statues and several museums.

Villa Farnesina was built as a country retreat for the Sienese banker Agostino Chigi. The villa is famous for its interior that boasts an abundance of frescoes, including several designed by Raphael.

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